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Description
Applied Public Health Teams
The U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) Applied Public Health Teams (APHT) provides resources and assistance to local health authorities throughout the United States. They were created in 2006 as part of the National Response Plan’s ESF-8 public health and medical asset provisions. There are currently five APHT, each of which is a work force comprising 47 USPHS trained Commissioned Corps officer responders. Each APHT is scalable, and can provide only those resources needed. The primary areas of APHT activities and reporting include epidemiology, surveillance, preventive (medical) services delivery, and environmental public health issues.
ASPR’s HHS emPOWER Map
The HHS emPOWER Map is a public and interactive map that provides the de-identified total number of Medicare beneficiary claims for certain electricity-dependent medical and assistive equipment that include: ventilators, oxygen concentrators, enteral feeding machines, intravenous (IV) infusion pumps, suction pumps, at-home dialysis machines, wheelchairs, scooters, and beds.  The data is updated monthly and provided both geospatially and in table format at the national, state, territory, county and zip code levels.
CDC CSELS Applied Public Health Advanced Laboratory Surveillance (DHIS)
The primary mission for the Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services (CSELS) is to provide scientific service, expertise, skills, and tools in support of CDC's national efforts to promote health; prevent disease, injury and disability; and prepare for emerging health threats. CSELS has four divisions which represent the tactical arm of CSELS, executing upon CSELS strategic objectives. The Division of Health Informatics and Surveillance (DHIS) advances the science and practice of public health informatics and surveillance.
CDC CSELS Division of Public Health Information Dissemination (DPHID)
The primary mission for the Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services (CSELS) is to provide scientific service, expertise, skills, and tools in support of CDC's national efforts to promote health; prevent disease, injury and disability; and prepare for emerging health threats. CSELS has four divisions which represent the tactical arm of CSELS, executing upon CSELS strategic objectives. The Division of Epidemiology, Analysis, and Library Services (DEALS) collaborates with our CDC and state and local public health partners to create and promote quality, timely and useful cross-cutting scientific products and services.
CDC Domestic Water Sanitation and Hygiene Epidemiology Teams
The Domestic Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Epidemiology Team is the lead epidemiology unit for U.S. water-related disease in CDC's National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases. This team tracks and investigates waterborne disease and outbreaks, builds waterborne disease prevention capability in state and local health departments, and develops effective prevention strategies to improve health. Other Centers, Institutes and Offices at CDC also provide capabilities to investigate waterborne disease and outbreaks.
CDC Food Safety
CDC's Outbreak Response and Prevention Branch (ORPB) collaborates with epidemiologists and other public health officials who investigate foodborne, waterborne, zoonotic, and other enteric (gastrointestinal) illnesses in the United States. ORPB works to ensure rapid and coordinated surveillance, detection, and response to multistate outbreaks caused by enteric bacteria, including Salmonella and Escherichia coli.
The Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services (DEEHS) within the CDC National Center for Environmental Health helps state and local food safety programs to identify and prevent environmental factors contributing to foodborne illness outbreaks.
CDC Vector Control
Within the CDC’s National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, the Division of Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD) is a national and international leader in the prevention and control of infections by vector-borne viruses and bacteria. Their strength is a uniquely skilled staff that includes physicians, veterinarians, entomologists, zoologists, epidemiologists, molecular biologists, and laboratory diagnosticians who aid state and U.S. territory health departments as well as international partners.
CDC Waterborne Disease Prevention
The Waterborne Disease Prevention Branch is the lead coordination and response unit for domestic and global water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH)-related disease in CDC's National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases.  The mission of the branch is to maximize the health, productivity, and well-being of people in the United States and around the globe through improved and sustained access to safe water for drinking, recreation, and other uses, adequate sanitation, and basic hygiene practices.
Mental Health Teams
The U.S. Public Health Service’s (USPHS) Mental Health Teams (MHT) provides resources and assistance to communities throughout the United States. They were created in 2006 as part of the National Response Plan’s ESF-8 public health and medical asset provisions and may be deployed in response to an ESF-8 or non-ESF-8 public health emergency. There are currently five MHT, each of which is a work force comprising 26 USPHS trained Commissioned Corps officer responders. Each MHT is scalable, and can provide only those resources needed.
National Incident Support Teams
The U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) National Incident Support Teams (NIST) provides resources and assistance to State, Tribal and local health authorities throughout the United States, usually as the Commissioned Corps component of an Incident Response Coordination Team (IRCT). They were created in 2009 as part of the National Response Framework’s ESF-8 public health and medical asset provisions. They may be deployed in response to an ESF-8 or non-ESF-8 public health emergency.
Regional Incident Support Teams
The U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) Regional Incident Support Teams (RIST) provides rapid assessments and initial incident coordination resources and assistance to State, Tribal and local health authorities within defined regions of the United States. They were created in 2009 as part of the National Response Framework’s ESF-8 public health and medical asset provisions. Like all Commissioned Corps response teams, they may be deployed in response to an ESF-8 or non-ESF-8 public health emergency or to meet urgent health needs. Each RIST is a short-term response asset available to Regional Emergency Coordinators and Regional Health Administrators within the region.